Search A.L.L.

 ALL1050 
Euripides: Andromache, Electra, and Hecabe 
Day/Time  Thursday 9:00-10:20 
Location C-106
SessionFirst 6 weeks 31-Jan
Limit: 25
  

The tragedies of Euripides burn with passion. The old myths explode with new and unexpected dramatic energy as Euripides delves into the darkest regions of human nature. Andromache challenges our concepts of loyalty and lawful wedlock. In Electra a brother and sisters horrific plan has unforeseen consequences. Hecabe brings war home to the victors. The course text is Euripides: Electra and Other Plays (Penguin, 2004). Please read Andromache through page 20 for the first class.

Coordinator: Nancy Yee

Nancy is a former English department chair and Professor Emerita at Fitchburg State University. She was first struck by the power and beauty of Greek drama while teaching it to college freshmen more than fifty years ago.

 

 

 

 ALL013 
Great Books 
Day/Time  Wednesday 10:30-11:50 
Location C-106
Session12 weeks 30-Jan
Limit: 25
  

This class will reflect on a wide range of ideas and authors such as Geoffrey Chaucer, Leo Tolstoy, Jhumpa Lahiri and Simone de Beauvoir. We will use the Great Books Series called Great Conversations, Volume 3, which focuses on various themes and uses selections from classic and contemporary works in various genres and disciplines. The book can be purchased online at greatbooks.org or by phone at 800-222-5870 ext 2. Class members will be encouraged to bring their questions and to volunteer to facilitate discussions.

Coordinator: Mary Joyce and Beverly Jacobson

Mary and Bev are professional teachers, lifelong learners and avid readers who encourage others to bring their questions, share their ideas and insights. Newcomers are always welcome.

 

 

 

 ALL1053 
Greek and Roman Mythology 
Day/Time  Wednesday 3:00-4:20 
Location C-106
Session12 weeks 30-Jan
Limit: 25
  

This course will introduce the class to the primary characters and important stories of classical Greek and Roman mythology and will survey leading theoretical approaches to the understanding of classical myth. This series of 24 half-hour Great Course lectures by University of Maryland's Elizabeth Vandiver will define myth and discuss various gods and goddesses, the Trojan War, the House of Atreus, King Oedipus, female monsters, Roman fables, and Ovid. The book, Bullfinch's Mythology is not required, but is recommended as an addition to these lectures.

Coordinator: Gershen Rosenblum

Gersh is a retired clinical psychologist who has coordinated several A.L.L. courses in the past.

 

 

 

ALL055 FULL
Loving the Short Story 
Day/Time  Thursday 1:30-2:50 
Location C-106
Session 12 weeks 31-Jan
Limit: 25
   

The students will discuss two stories at each session, sharing ideas and perceptions to enhance the understanding of the readings. The text for this course will be Best American Short Stories 2018 edited by Roxane Gay. The assignment for the first class: Please read the Introduction, Cougar by Maria Anderson and A Family by Jamel Brinkley.

Coordinator: Sheryl Lajoie and Elizabeth Moylan

Sheryl has led this class for many years and thoroughly enjoys analyzing the stories and gaining amazing insights from class participants. Betty shares the love of short stories and is a valuable asset to the short story discussions. Betty shares the love of short stories and is a valuable asset to the short story discussions.

 

 

 

ALL1055  FULL
The Greatest Novels Ever (In Excerpts) 
Day/Time  Wednesday 10:30-11:50 
Location C-115
Session 12 weeks 30-Jan
Limit: 25
   

The coordinator will provide short excerpts from great novels and short fiction in an effort to introduce readers to books that they may not otherwise consider. We will discuss why the book is good, why it is worth your time, and what lies ahead.

Coordinator: Stephen Pastore

Stephen is the author of several articles and three books on art history and has taught art history at the university level.

 

 

 

 ALL479 
Women in Literature 
Day/Time  Wednesday 12:00-1:20 
Location C-115
Session12 weeks 30-Jan
Limit: 25
  

This reading discussion course examines the roles, nature, and relationships of women through fiction, poetry, drama, and essays written by women. We will focus on two of the most acclaimed female writers of the 20th and 21st centuries: Alice Munro, masterful short story writer and winner of the Nobel Peace Prize in Literature for 2013, and Marge Piercy, poet, novelist, playwright, essayist, social activist, and Cape Codder! Their lives and art should give us much to examine and relate to. The texts are Too Much Happiness by Alice Munro and My Mother's Body by Marge Piercy. Both can be purchased online at thriftbooks.com. Please bring both texts to the first class.

Coordinator: Elaine Horne

Elaine is a retired Professor of English and English Department Chair from Manchester Community College in Connecticut. Prior to that, she was an adjunct professor at Central Connecticut State University and Greater Hartford Community College.